Good Yarn Workshops coming up!

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Author: Bridget Frame

Good Yarn Workshops:

  • KAIKOURA - Wednesday 9th May 10.30pm - 2pm Lobster Inn
  • CULVERDEN - Thursday 10th May 10.30pm - 2pm Rugby Clubrooms

 
People who live and work on the land have to cope with a number of challenges – from long working hours to unexpected weather events, isolation and financial pressure. They’re all factors that can affect their mental wellbeing. To take care of yourself, and be able to help others,  one of the best things you can do is talk.
GoodYarn is a hands-on workshop that will give you the practical tools and confidence to be able to talk to people in rural communities about mental health.
All GoodYarn workshops are run by experienced facilitators who have a wealth of knowledge of the rural sector.
‘Very useful and targeted at rural concerns. Practically focused.’ ‘Excellent workshop, Everyone can learn something from it.’ ‘Non-confrontational approach. Realistic, relaxed, relevant.’ – GoodYarn workshop participants
Numbers are limited. Register today

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First winter storm sweeping the country

midday, 10 April 2018

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson

As the winter weather is making itself felt, most recently with tornadoes in Taranaki and Ruapehu, please stay safe and travel only if absolutely necessary.

Treat all lines as live and report power outages to your supplier.

Please ask for assistance if you need it, and keep an eye on your neighbours.

For updates at this stage please refer to https://www.facebook.com/TaranakiCivilDefence/ and https://www.facebook.com/ruapehudc/

Weather updates http://www.metservice.com/national/home.

Pic below of unoccupied home, taken from Ruapehu District Council facebook page.

 

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Good Yarn Workshops coming up!

Monday, February 26, 2018

Author: Bridget Frame

GOOD YARN - "Enabling Farming communities to talk about Mental Health"
GY is a hands on workshop that will give you the practical tools and confidence to be able to talk to people in rural communities about mental health.

Workshops are run by experienced facilitators from the North Canterbury Rural Support Trust

They are free to attend for farmers, rural professionals, people living and working in rural communities

Bring a friend, colleague or neighbour

Registrations to Gayle  litchi@farmside.co.nz  or Ph 027 4171 812

 


Wednesday 7th March Rugby Rooms Little River 3.30-7pm

Wednesday 14th March JC Rooms Oxford 3.30-7pm


 

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Cleaning up after ex-Cyclone Gita

Suggestions for rural communities

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson

After a flood or storm

* Continue to listen to your local radio station for civil defence instructions.

* Help others if you can, especially people who may require special assistance.

* Throw away food and water that has been contaminated by floodwater.

* Avoid drinking or preparing food with tap water until you are certain it is not contaminated. 

* If a boil water notice is in place, follow steps to sterilize dairy cleaning equipment

* Ensure stock and domestic animals have food, water, and shelter where necessary, and are secure. Ensure that all stock injuries are promptly attended too, after human needs are meet.

* Look for and report broken utility lines. Treat all lines as live.

* If your property is damaged, take notes and photographs for insurance purposes. Lodge insurance claims as soon as possible.

* Assess damage to water supply and reticulation systems. Which troughs are contaminated with silt and will need cleaning?

* Assess damage to access lanes, tracks, gateways, culverts and fences. What clearing away of flood debris is needed?

* Assess damage to pastures, the depth and type of silt.

* Assess available non-flooded pastures and other undamaged feed reserves.

* Use the resources available. Contact local council civil defence flood relief co-ordinator, industry groups, Federated Farmers, Rural Support Trusts, Rural Women NZ, or other resource providers. 

* Please accept help when offered, and ask for it if you need it.

Dairy NZ advice for farmers without power:

  • Cows can go several days without being milked provided they are well fed and watered
  • When power returns, ensure cows are milked out completely
  • For further advice;  www.dairynz.co.nz/farm/adverse-events/

Useful sites and numbers:

* Civil Defence website https://www.civildefence.govt.nz/

* Your local Rural Support Trust to update your information or ask for help for you, a partner, family member, worker or neighbour: 0800 RURAL HELP (0800 787 254)  www.rural-support.org.nz

*Animal welfare https://www.mpi.govt.nz/protection-and-response/animal-welfare/animals-in-emergencies/

*Federated Farmers Feedline https://www.fedfarm.org.nz/FFPublic/Adverse_Events_Farmer_Support_and_Feedline.aspx

* Your local council website and facebook page

 

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News & Alerts

Rural Recovery BBQ's - 1 year on

Take a break and come enjoy a BBQ on us

Friday, May 11, 2018

Author: JodieCraig


 

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Post-flood advice for rural people **update on bore water**

Bay of Plenty 5 May

Friday, May 04, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson

 

Download this sheet for details on taking care of yourself, your family, your animals and your business.

Update from Rotorua Lakes Council: Rural properties on bore water

Septic tanks are a potential source of faecal contamination to flood waters and it is possible for surface water to travel down the outer casing of a bore into groundwater.

If your drinking water supply is from a bore and there was flood water around the borehead, then there is a risk that your bore water might be contaminated. If this is the case then please boil your water before drinking and have your water tested to confirm whether your water supply is safe.  

Rotorua Lakes Council's laboratory can test your drinking water to determine the presence of Ecoli, which is an indicator of faecal contamination, free of charge to those affected by the storm. To arrange a sample, collect a bottle from the lab at the Wastewater Treatment Plant off Te Ngae Road or contact Council on 07 348 4199 for more information.

http://www.rotorualakescouncil.nz/our-services/CDrecoveryproject/Pages/Rural-areas.aspx 

Other useful contacts and information

Rotorua Lakes Council helpline: 0800 020 001

 Rural Support Trust 0800 787 254

 Ministry for Primary: Industries (Animal Welfare): 0800 00 83 33

 Rotorua SPCA: 07 349 2995

 EQC: https://www.eqc.govt.nz/about-eqc/our-publications/factsheets/storm-damage.

 Your insurer, bank, advisors and accountant.

 Bay of Plenty Regional Council: 0800 884 880: www.boprc.govt.nz

 Waikato Regional Council:0800 800 401: www.waikatoregion.govt.nz

 DairyNZ: 0800 4 DairyNZ (0800 4 324 7969)

 Fonterra for milk collection issues / special collection arrangement 0800 656568

 Federated Farmers: 0800 FARMING (0800 327 646)

 

IN AN EMERGENCY DIAL 111

 

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Keeping an eye on Cyclone Hola

Monday, March 12, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson

https://twitter.com/twitter/statuses/972915753044201472

NIWA: With Hola passing offshore today, its strongest winds will too!

NIWA's high resolution modelling indicates some gusts to 70 km/h for: eastern Northland, Great Barrier Island, the Coromandel, coastal Bay of Plenty, & Gisborne Ranges, then a bit gusty in Auckland tonight.

 

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Early dry classified as medium-scale adverse event

Minister for Agriculture and Rural Communities Damien O’Connor today announced the fast-growing drought in parts of the lower North Island would be classified as a medium-scale adverse event.

Saturday, December 23, 2017

Author: Terri Anderson

https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/early-dry-declared-adverse-event

Minister for Agriculture and Rural Communities Damien O’Connor today announced the fast-growing drought in parts of the lower North Island would be classified as a medium-scale adverse event. 

The affected areas include Taranaki region and western parts of the Manawatu-Whanganui and Wellington regions. 

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One of these things is not like the other

It’s easy to see if there’s a flood or an earthquake, but drought’s an odd one to call. When does a dry spell become a drought?

Friday, December 08, 2017

Author: Terri Anderson

It’s easy to see if there’s a flood or an earthquake, but drought’s an odd one to call. When does a dry spell become a drought?

Dry spells and droughts are part of life for many farmers across New Zealand. Farmers monitor their local conditions, plan for dry weather, and make tough decisions early.

MPI doesn’t declare droughts, but help to identify if the impacts of a drought on the primary sector should be classified as a medium- or large-scale adverse event, under the criteria in the Primary Sector Recovery Policy.  

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Dry summer support

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Author: Marcia

The NIWA drought index measures dry conditions across the country. Their hotspot watch helps identify areas that are getting dry each week.

Like all adverse events, a drought is classified as either localised, medium-scale or large-scale.

What farmers need to do now

Don’t hold out for rain as a reason to delay any decisions you need to make. Make plans and decisions in light of current conditions and warm temperatures driving high evapotranspiration. It will take significant rainfall to slow down or reverse the dry conditions. 

That it is so dry so early in the season may further limit your options, or create uncertainty, such as decisions on which animals to sell or cull.

In many locations stock feed in the form of hay and silage is lower than normal due to the wet winter and spring. You need to understand your local situation and factor these delays in your planning.

Tips from farmers who have managed their way through past dry spells:

  •  Review the technical information from your industry bodies on managing in dry weather.
  • Do a feed budget.
  • Make a plan and set trigger points to make decisions or take action: Dates, stock condition, feed availability; Once a day milking, drying off, culling early.  Ensure relevant contract partners agree with the plan. When those points or times hit, enact your plan.
  • Keep an eye on climate predictions and soil moisture levels, especially on your own farm as it can vary from your neighbours’. (NIWA is useful).
  • Use water efficiently and plan for water restrictions. Check irrigation consents for any triggers that will require you to make changes to usage.
  • Ensure bores are well maintained and make contingency plans in case supply fails.
  • Look after your animals and regularly check their condition.
  • Make decisions for slaughter well in advance and book space in time (since killing space may be in high demand in your area)
  • Be vigilant on very hot days. Animals cannot be left for much time with no shade or access to water.
  • Be aware of increased risk of fire and take precautions
  • Talk to your bank, accountants and other advisors, seek their advice, and ask for help if you need it.        
  • Your Rural Support Trust is here to help. If you need to get pointed in the right direction for advice or information, are concerned about a friend, a neighbour, a worker…. or just need a private chat, their services are free & confidential. Call 0800 RURAL HELP (0800 787 254) or visit www.rural-support.org.nz.

This document will give you some tips and tricks for mitigating the dry hot summer conditions.

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Leptospirosis awareness

increase in animals in the Bay of Plenty

Monday, November 13, 2017

Author: Terri Anderson

There has been an increase in leptospirosis bacteria in domestic animals and livestock in the Bay of Plenty. This is not uncommon in areas that have been flooded, and have damp soil or stagnant water.

Leptospirosis is easy to catch from an infected animal and where it lives.

For further information on leptospirosis talk to your vet or search safer farms lepto  http://saferfarms.org.nz/guides/prevention-and-control-of-leptospirosis/

 

 

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Don't miss! An evening with Doug Avery

Friday 3 November

Sunday, October 29, 2017

Author: Terri Anderson

The BOP Rural Support Trust is holding an evening out for the rural community at the Little Theatre in Whakatane on Friday 3 November from 7:00 – 9:00pm.

Come and hear Doug Avery share his powerful story of how he turned his Marlborough farm – and his life – around.

He has some great tips for all of us dealing with what life throws at us.

Tickets are $10 each, from Paper Plus on the Strand in Whakatane. Light refreshments will be served and Doug’s book “The resilient farmer” will be on sale.

If you need some help or you’re are concerned about someone close to you in rural Bay of Plenty, then you can call the Rural Support Trust on 0800 787 254.

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Doug Avery's Resilient Farmer

bite-sized videos

Sunday, October 29, 2017

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Extra boost for Bay of Plenty farmers

Media release from Anne Tolley and Nathan Guy

Friday, August 04, 2017

Author: Terri Anderson

www.beehive.govt.nz/release/extra-boost-bay-plenty-farmers

Anne Tolley, Nathan Guy

4 AUGUST, 2017

Flood-hit farmers in the Bay of Plenty region will have a further opportunity to apply for a grant to help with clean up and recovery, say Social Development Minister Anne Tolley and Minister for Primary Industries Nathan Guy.

The $100,000 Primary Industries Flood Recovery Fund is part of a package of additional support totalling $295,000 for farms and orchards who suffered damage following the floods. 

“The Government is committed to ensuring communities in the Bay of Plenty have the support they need to recover from the April floods,” says Mrs Tolley.

“The first Bay of Plenty Primary Industries Flood Recovery Fund was on a first-come first-served basis and all grants were allocated after just a couple of weeks. Farmers who missed out on the first round of funding can now apply for grants of $2000, $5000, or $10,000.

“This support is in addition to the $1 million funding provided to enable Enhanced Taskforce Green teams to clear debris from towns, rural properties, and parks and reserves.”

“The Bay of Plenty Rural Support Trust and agencies on the ground have been taking stock as clean up continues. They have told me there are still a number of affected primary producers who could really use a grant to help them with re-establishment of pastures and crops, and the clean-up of silt and debris,” says Mr Guy.

“I’m also further bolstering the Rural Support Trust who have been working tirelessly with local agri-business and agencies to assist in recovery. Funding will also help the rural recovery coordinator continue, and helping farm relief workers to be continue to be available through the Trust.

“Priorities for rural recovery in the region include ongoing psychosocial support, restoration of farm productivity, and building resilience to future events, particularly on flood-prone land.

“Looking to the future is fundamental and the funding also covers extension services to farmers.

“I appreciate the work of the Whakatane District Council who have provided support to administer both rounds of the grants on behalf of the region.” 

Applications for this further round of grants can be made via the Whakatane District Council until 29 September, and will be assessed on need.

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