FARM MUSIC

FARM MUSIC

The Hills of Taranaki are alive with music ###

Published on Tuesday, August 18, 2020

Renowned drummer, composer and educator Chris O’Connor pairs with sound installation artist Dr Bridget Johnson in partnership with Rural Support Taranaki and the Taranaki Retreat (https://www.taranakiretreat.org.nz) to bring together a unique community arts collaboration focused on creativity, mental health and wellbeing support for participants.

Farm Music will bring men together to explore innovative ways to play with sound and to create their improvised compositions and sound sculptures in a rural environment, from items found in their backyard, shed, paddock or garage. The men will work with O’Connor (who has performed with musicians as diverse as Don McGlashan, Trinity Roots, Neil Finn, Nadia Reid, Leila Adu, Jeff Henderson and the Auckland Chamber Orchestra) and Johnson, Senior Lecturer at the Massey School of Music and Creative Media Production in Wellington.

This innovative installation work will be showcased at Reset 2020 https://www.reset2020.co.nz/shows/farm-music/ presented by the Taranaki Arts Festival, where audiences can meet the participants and creative team and hear the sounds of rural Taranaki in a brand-new way. Farm Music is funded by Creative New Zealand https://www.creativenz.govt.nz/. Farm Music is looking for Taranaki men to participate!

If you would like to find out more, or join the project, please email the Producer Sally Barnett at sally@flock.nz or join the Facebook group Farm Music Taranaki https://www.facebook.com/groups/farmmusictaranaki/about/

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Author: Marcia

Categories: Taranaki

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