Trying to cope with extreme weather - drought, floods, cyclones?

Their impact on the productivity of Northland's rural sector can be severe. Contact the Northland Rural Support Trust to help you through the tough times.

We are part of a nationwide network which helps rural people and their families during and after extreme weather or events which affect your livelihoods. This includes pastoral farming, forestry horticulture and other land based activities.

The Trust has access to networks, services, and government funding following an adverse event to help you get back on your feet. Our members are rural people who have faced the challenges that rural life brings. Free and confidential help is available through the Trust's coordinator, and contact is one-on-one at a place that suits you.

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News & Alerts

Free Collaboration Community Dinner 7 November at Tauhoa Hall

the final of our series of community dinners this year - join us for a fun time

Saturday, November 03, 2018

Author: Julie Jonker
 
 

 

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Categories: Northland

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Mycoplasma Bovis information

Facts and Links

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Author: Julie Jonker

WHAT IS MYCOPLASMA BOVIS

•          Mycoplasma bovis causes illness in cattle including mastitis, abortion, pneumonia, and arthritis.

•          Silent spreaders – cows can be infected but not ill.

•          It does not infect humans and is not a food safety risk.

•          It occurs commonly in most cattle producing countries around the world.

•          Difficult disease to detect – it hides.

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Categories: National, Northland

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Coastal Hazards Map

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Author: Julie Jonker
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Categories: Northland

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When farmland is flooded by seawater

Storm surges and king tides

Tuesday, January 09, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson

What happens to farmland which has been flooded by seawater?

  • The impact will depend on how long the crop or pasture is covered by seawater. If it’s only for a short time – up to 48 hours – and gets good rainfall, grasses should bounce back. 
  • Rain is needed to wash the salt away. It’s likely the saltwater was diluted by the rains during the storm which measured up to 70mm.
  • The last similar event in the areas was 15 July 1995. This was during winter, there was plenty of rain to wash out, and pasture recovered well over a three month period.

 

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Donations

We are a voluntary Charitable Trust and would welcome your donation to help us continue supporting our Rural Families.

You can make a donation in the following ways:

Bank Transfer:
BNZ Whangarei, 02-0492-0084131-00, ref: Donation

For a receipt: P O Box 77, Whangarei 0140