Cyclone Season

What to do in case of severe rain/storm

Monday, December 24, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson

Before severe rain

· Keep an eye on weather reports and enact your plans for moving stock and supplementary feed to higher ground if needed.

· Clear gutters and drains where possible

· Have to hand a smartphone, a charger for the car, a torch, and a battery-powered radio

· Check your insurance cover details

 

During a flood or storm

· Keep an eye on https://www.civildefence.govt.nz/ and your regional council websites/facebook or radio station

· The safety of you, your family, and workers comes first.

· Move stock to safety, shelter and water and make sure they can't wander. Are the electric fences working?

· Turn off utilities if told to do so by authorities as it can help prevent damage to your home or community. Unplug small appliances to avoid damage from power surges.

· Do not attempt to drive or walk through floodwaters unless essential.

· Check power and phones. Report outages.

· Check dogs, poultry and pets.

· Check on neighbours - do they need help or can they help you?

· Check buildings at risk, feed stacks. · Use generators if necessary to keep pumps, refrigeration, electric fences and household appliances running. Flood pumps may need attention. 

 

Further information:

https://www.dairynz.co.nz/business/adverse-events/flood/

https://beeflambnz.com/news-views/topics/flooding

MPI Animal welfare 

 

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Updates on the Mycoplasma bovis eradication

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson

For weekly updates to your email sign up to MPI's stakeholder update. It is for you, your farmers, and anyone interested in the eradication of Mycoplasma bovisSign up here and please get all your networks of farmers and rural professionals to do so too.  


 

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John Shackleton: Manage stress

A presentation in Taranaki - watch the video!

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson

https://www.facebook.com/centraltaranakisafecommunitytrust/videos/2296467993701776/

John Shackleton events in Stratford yesterday encouraged the audience to consider mindfulness (it's not scary) and breathing meditations to enable thoughts to be current and now. Our wiring needs to be changed so we stop thinking about things we have NO CONTROL over such as guilt over past events or anxiety about the future. After 21 days you will notice a big improvement in wellbeing. 

 

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Lock it in with Sam

Sam Whitelock promotes the 5 Ways to Wellbeing... Southland Rural Support Trust agrees

Friday, June 29, 2018

Author: LindsayWright

Southland Rural Support Trust backs Sam Whitelock with all 5 Ways to Wellbeing

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Number of views (3188)

Gisborne flooding a medium scale event

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson

Flooding damage around the Tolaga Bay area of Gisborne meets the criteria for a medium scale event, Minister for Agriculture and Rural Communities Damien O’Connor and Associate Agriculture Minister Meka Whaitiri announced today.

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When farmland is flooded by seawater

Storm surges and king tides

Tuesday, January 09, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson

What happens to farmland which has been flooded by seawater?

  • The impact will depend on how long the crop or pasture is covered by seawater. If it’s only for a short time – up to 48 hours – and gets good rainfall, grasses should bounce back. 
  • Rain is needed to wash the salt away. It’s likely the saltwater was diluted by the rains during the storm which measured up to 70mm.
  • The last similar event in the areas was 15 July 1995. This was during winter, there was plenty of rain to wash out, and pasture recovered well over a three month period.

 

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One of these things is not like the other

It’s easy to see if there’s a flood or an earthquake, but drought’s an odd one to call. When does a dry spell become a drought?

Friday, December 08, 2017

Author: Terri Anderson

It’s easy to see if there’s a flood or an earthquake, but drought’s an odd one to call. When does a dry spell become a drought?

Dry spells and droughts are part of life for many farmers across New Zealand. Farmers monitor their local conditions, plan for dry weather, and make tough decisions early.

MPI doesn’t declare droughts, but help to identify if the impacts of a drought on the primary sector should be classified as a medium- or large-scale adverse event, under the criteria in the Primary Sector Recovery Policy.  

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Dry summer support

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Author: Marcia

The NIWA drought index measures dry conditions across the country. Their hotspot watch helps identify areas that are getting dry each week.

Like all adverse events, a drought is classified as either localised, medium-scale or large-scale.

What farmers need to do now

Don’t hold out for rain as a reason to delay any decisions you need to make. Make plans and decisions in light of current conditions and warm temperatures driving high evapotranspiration. It will take significant rainfall to slow down or reverse the dry conditions. 

That it is so dry so early in the season may further limit your options, or create uncertainty, such as decisions on which animals to sell or cull.

In many locations stock feed in the form of hay and silage is lower than normal due to the wet winter and spring. You need to understand your local situation and factor these delays in your planning.

Tips from farmers who have managed their way through past dry spells:

  •  Review the technical information from your industry bodies on managing in dry weather.
  • Do a feed budget.
  • Make a plan and set trigger points to make decisions or take action: Dates, stock condition, feed availability; Once a day milking, drying off, culling early.  Ensure relevant contract partners agree with the plan. When those points or times hit, enact your plan.
  • Keep an eye on climate predictions and soil moisture levels, especially on your own farm as it can vary from your neighbours’. (NIWA is useful).
  • Use water efficiently and plan for water restrictions. Check irrigation consents for any triggers that will require you to make changes to usage.
  • Ensure bores are well maintained and make contingency plans in case supply fails.
  • Look after your animals and regularly check their condition.
  • Make decisions for slaughter well in advance and book space in time (since killing space may be in high demand in your area)
  • Be vigilant on very hot days. Animals cannot be left for much time with no shade or access to water.
  • Be aware of increased risk of fire and take precautions
  • Talk to your bank, accountants and other advisors, seek their advice, and ask for help if you need it.        
  • Your Rural Support Trust is here to help. If you need to get pointed in the right direction for advice or information, are concerned about a friend, a neighbour, a worker…. or just need a private chat, their services are free & confidential. Call 0800 RURAL HELP (0800 787 254) or visit www.rural-support.org.nz.

This document will give you some tips and tricks for mitigating the dry hot summer conditions.

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Ex-Cyclone Donna brings heavy rain warnings

Update as at 2pm, 12 May 2017

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Author: Terri Anderson

Ex-Cyclone Donna is bringing heavy rain. Keep an eye on the forecast and, if you are prone to flooding, enact your plans.  Whakatane, Rangitaiki, and Tarawera Rivers have reached level 1 and farmers are encouraged to move stock to higher ground.

MPI is working with local stakeholders to monitor the impacts of Ex-Cyclone Donna as the storm hits New Zealand. Farmers and smallholding owners are encouraged to follow their procedures in case of possible flooding on aready saturated ground.

If a flood is likely:

The safety of you, your family, and workers comes first. If your property is at risk from flooding, enact your plans:

  • Moving stock and feed to higher ground
  • Making sure your stock has shelter and water, and can't wander
  • Safely storing or tying down anything that might blow away.
  • Your battery-powered radio at the ready and listening for updates
  • Your smartphone charged up
  • Checking power and phones. Reporting outages. Treating all lines as live.
  • Checking dogs, poultry and pets.
  • Checking on neighbours - do they need help or can they help you?
  • Using generators if necessary to keep pumps, refrigeration, electric fences and household appliances running. Flood pumps may need attention.

General information on managing through flooding is here: http://www.getthru.govt.nz/disasters/flood

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News & Alerts

Cyclone Season

What to do in case of severe rain/storm

Monday, December 24, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson
Before severe rain · Keep an eye on weather reports and enact your plans for moving stock and supplementary feed to higher ground if needed. · Clear gutters and drains where possible · Have to hand a smartphone, a charger for the car, a torch, and a battery-powered radio · Check your insurance cover details   During a flood or storm...
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Number of views (1625)

Mycoplasma Bovis information

Facts and Links

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Author: Julie Jonker
WHAT IS MYCOPLASMA BOVIS •          Mycoplasma bovis causes illness in cattle including mastitis, abortion, pneumonia, and arthritis. •          Silent spreaders – cows can be infected but not ill. •          It does not infect...
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Coastal Hazards Map

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Author: Julie Jonker
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Number of views (1188)
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When farmland is flooded by seawater

Storm surges and king tides

Tuesday, January 09, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson
What happens to farmland which has been flooded by seawater? The impact will depend on how long the crop or pasture is covered by seawater. If it’s only for a short time – up to 48 hours – and gets good rainfall, grasses should bounce back.  Rain is needed to wash the salt away. It’s likely the saltwater was diluted by the rains during the storm which...
Comments (0)
Number of views (3594)

One of these things is not like the other

It’s easy to see if there’s a flood or an earthquake, but drought’s an odd one to call. When does a dry spell become a drought?

Friday, December 08, 2017

Author: Terri Anderson
It’s easy to see if there’s a flood or an earthquake, but drought’s an odd one to call. When does a dry spell become a drought? Dry spells and droughts are part of life for many farmers across New Zealand. Farmers monitor their local conditions, plan for dry weather, and make tough decisions early. MPI doesn’t declare droughts, but help to identify if the impacts...
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Number of views (4108)

NZ Drought Index

Check how the conditions are shaping up

Thursday, November 23, 2017

Author: Julie Jonker

NZ Drought Index

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Number of views (1363)
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Categories: Northland, Taranaki

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New NRC Tsumani evacuation Maps

Check your address

Friday, August 25, 2017

Author: Julie Jonker
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Number of views (1090)
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Myrtle Rust

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Author: Marcia
Myrtle rust find in new region MPI Media Release Date: 23 May 2017 A positive detection of myrtle rust has been made in the Waikato region. This new find, along with a further 3 properties in Taranaki, brings the total number of confirmed infected properties to 16 nationally. People can report any suspected signs of myrtle rust to MPI's Exotic Pest and Disease Hotline on 0800...
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Farmstrong

Live Well Farm Well

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Author: Julie Jonker
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Five Ways to Wellbeing

Simple ways to keep well

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Author: Julie Jonker

A review of the most up-to-date evidence and found that building five actions into day to day lives is important for the wellbeing of individuals, families, communities and organisations.

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Number of views (1486)
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