The Northland Rural Support Trust can help you during and following an adverse event by:

Being a facilitator

Following an adverse event, we can assist you as you decide business options; provide mentors or colleagues from rural backgrounds to talk to; and act as facilitators for financial assistance, Work and Income support and labour assistance.

Being a contact

We are directly linked into local Civil Defence and can provide you with information about what's happening, what the risks are, and getting emergency help. A key role of the Trust is to strengthen the network of rural landowners, managers, professional and other industry organisations.

Being a listening ear

The Trust members have rural experience and can help you get back on your feet. If you or someone you know is affected by an adverse event or is facing a personal challenge, we can facilitate referral to professional counselling, financial advice and farm management expertise.

News & Alerts

When farmland is flooded by seawater

Coastal North Island New Year storms

Tuesday, January 09, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson

What happens to farmland which has been flooded by seawater?

  • The impact will depend on how long the crop or pasture is covered by seawater. If it’s only for a short time – up to 48 hours – and gets good rainfall, grasses should bounce back. 
  • Rain is needed to wash the salt away. It’s likely the saltwater was diluted by the rains during the storm which measured up to 70mm.
  • The last similar event in the areas was 15 July 1995. This was during winter, there was plenty of rain to wash out, and pasture recovered well over a three month period.

 

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Early dry classified as medium-scale adverse event

Minister for Agriculture and Rural Communities Damien O’Connor today announced the fast-growing drought in parts of the lower North Island would be classified as a medium-scale adverse event.

Saturday, December 23, 2017

Author: Terri Anderson

https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/early-dry-declared-adverse-event

Minister for Agriculture and Rural Communities Damien O’Connor today announced the fast-growing drought in parts of the lower North Island would be classified as a medium-scale adverse event. 

The affected areas include Taranaki region and western parts of the Manawatu-Whanganui and Wellington regions. 

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Monitoring the dry

What is being done and what we can do

Friday, December 22, 2017

Author: Julie Jonker
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Categories: Northland

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One of these things is not like the other

It’s easy to see if there’s a flood or an earthquake, but drought’s an odd one to call. When does a dry spell become a drought?

Friday, December 08, 2017

Author: Terri Anderson

It’s easy to see if there’s a flood or an earthquake, but drought’s an odd one to call. When does a dry spell become a drought?

Dry spells and droughts are part of life for many farmers across New Zealand. Farmers monitor their local conditions, plan for dry weather, and make tough decisions early.

MPI doesn’t declare droughts, but help to identify if the impacts of a drought on the primary sector should be classified as a medium- or large-scale adverse event, under the criteria in the Primary Sector Recovery Policy.  

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Donations

We are a voluntary Charitable Trust and would welcome your donation to help us continue supporting our Rural Families.

You can make a donation in the following ways:

Bank Transfer:
BNZ Whangarei, 02-0492-0084131-00, ref: Donation

For a receipt: P O Box 77, Whangarei 0140