Drought classification extends further to Southland and Otago

HON DAMIEN O’CONNOR

Published on Wednesday, January 31, 2018

https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/drought-classification-extends-further-southland-and-otago

Minister for Agriculture and Rural Communities Damien O’Connor today announced that the medium-scale adverse event classification for the drought in parts of the country would be extended to the whole of Southland plus Otago’s Queenstown Lakes, Central Otago and Clutha districts. 

The classification triggers additional funding of up to $130,000 for the local Rural Support Trusts and industry groups to coordinate recovery support. 

“We’ve been working with local farming groups, councils and NIWA to monitor how the drought has been progressing and the impact on the farming communities,” said Mr O’Connor. 

“Anticipated rain that could have provided respite just hasn’t fallen in the right areas to mitigate the effects of the early hot dry summer. 

“Farmers have been unable to grow sufficient feed for winter, and have been using stored feed and buying in supplements for stock, as well as selling off animals.  

“Some useful rain is predicted for this week, however the drought has already taken its toll on farms and will take time to recover from. While rain now would allow pasture to grow, this can take a month to translate into feed for animals, and many are now well behind in preparing for winter.  

“So the recovery assistance measures are as important as ever, even when we finally get decent rain.” 

The formal request for the classification was made by drought committees and rural communities yesterday in a letter to Mr O’Connor – in which they highlighted this was an extremely unusual event for Southland. 

“Organisations in the regions are gearing up to assist farmers with feed budgets, technical information and farm management, and stress management. The early start to a hot dry summer has now taken its toll on the groundwater and rivers in the south of the country, and farmers are working hard to look after their animals in a very challenging climate.” 

The Minister of Revenue has welcomed the activation of Inland Revenue’s income equalisation discretions for this drought, and Inland Revenue will also consider hardship situations. Farmers should contact their accountants in the first instance.  

The drought was originally classified as a medium-scale adverse event in the North Island across Taranaki, western parts of Manawatu-Whanganui and Wellington, and the Grey and Buller districts of the South Island’s West Coast over the Christmas period. Significant rain has improved soil moisture in some of those areas, but recovery from the drought is an ongoing process.

 

More information

Your Rural Support Trust is here to help. Call 0800 787 254 or go to www.rural-support.org.nz

Federated Farmers' Feedline is open to members and non-members sourcing or offering feed: www.fedfarm.org.nz/FFPublic/Adverse_Events_Farmer_Support_and_Feedline.aspx 

Criteria for medium scale event classification

Like all adverse events, a drought is classified as either localised, medium-scale, or large-scale. MPI doesn’t declare droughts. Rather, they work with local stakeholders when there is a drought and determine how it should be classified, based on its impact on the rural sector.

MPI assesses each adverse event based on the:

  • options available for farmers to prepare for the event
  • magnitude of the event (likelihood and scale of the physical impact)
  • capacity of the community to cope (economic and social impact)

Drought committees

Both Otago and Southland have formed drought committees and have been actively working with their communities, such as hosting information events with DairyNZ, Beef + Lamb NZ, Federated Farmers, Environment Southland, Otago Regional Council and others, to give farmers the latest information around the drought and their options to get through it.

Comments (0)Number of views (1588)

Author: Terri Anderson

Categories: National, Otago, Southland

Tags:

Print

Name:
Email:
Subject:
Message:
x

News & Alerts

Lance Burdett article in Farmers' Weekly

Wednesday, May 08, 2019

Author: Terri Anderson
Perhaps the biggest hinderance to farmers' wellbeing is their lack of social life, says former police crisis negotiator Lance Burdett, who has begun his tour of the South Island to encourage wellness. https://ruralnewsgroup.co.nz/rural-news/rural-general-news/farmers-it-s-good-to-talk?fbclid=IwAR1ddSAGlktVp5OfckrHCJlXCYLaLZHMHuesQljcIjUW0wFRM5X8uYtylfY Make sure you book in!  
Comments (0)
Number of views (478)

From the front line to the back paddocks

Safety, wellness and resilience expert Lance Burdett tours rural New Zealand.

Wednesday, April 03, 2019

Author: Terri Anderson
It’s a long way from negotiating with hostage-takers to touring rural New Zealand, but that’s where Lance Burdett’s career path has gone so far. He’s about to embark on a tour of rural South Island thanks to a series of talks put together by New Zealand’s local Rural Support Trusts and the Ministry for Primary Industries. Founder of Warn International, Lance...
Comments (0)
Number of views (1736)

Dairy NZ flood information

for Otago and Southland

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson
Comments (0)
Number of views (941)
Read more

Categories: National, Otago, Southland

Tags:

Updates on the Mycoplasma bovis eradication

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson
For weekly updates to your email sign up to MPI's stakeholder update. It is for you, your farmers, and anyone interested in the eradication of Mycoplasma bovis. Sign up here and please get all your networks of farmers and rural professionals to do so too.    
Comments (0)
Number of views (2749)

John Shackleton: Manage stress

A presentation in Taranaki - watch the video!

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson
https://www.facebook.com/centraltaranakisafecommunitytrust/videos/2296467993701776/ John Shackleton events in Stratford yesterday encouraged the audience to consider mindfulness (it's not scary) and breathing meditations to enable thoughts to be current and now. Our wiring needs to be changed so we stop thinking about things we have NO CONTROL over such as guilt over past events or...
Comments (0)
Number of views (3056)

Lock it in with Sam

Sam Whitelock promotes the 5 Ways to Wellbeing... Southland Rural Support Trust agrees

Friday, June 29, 2018

Author: LindsayWright

Southland Rural Support Trust backs Sam Whitelock with all 5 Ways to Wellbeing

Comments (0)
Number of views (3992)

Drought classification extends further to Southland and Otago

HON DAMIEN O’CONNOR

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Author: Terri Anderson

https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/drought-classification-extends-further-southland-and-otago

 

Comments (0)
Number of views (1588)
Read more

Categories: National, Otago, Southland

Tags:

Minister O'Connor's update on dry conditions

https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/govt-closely-watching-dry-conditions

Thursday, December 21, 2017

Author: Terri Anderson
Farmers and growers in very dry regions around the country are urged to make plans to get through a summer that has turned hot and dry sooner than usual. Minister for Agriculture and Rural Communities Damien O’Connor said today that the latest information from NIWA and industry bodies makes it clear that while farmers are generally coping through this early dry spell, rain over the...
Comments (0)
Number of views (4146)

One of these things is not like the other

It’s easy to see if there’s a flood or an earthquake, but drought’s an odd one to call. When does a dry spell become a drought?

Friday, December 08, 2017

Author: Terri Anderson
It’s easy to see if there’s a flood or an earthquake, but drought’s an odd one to call. When does a dry spell become a drought? Dry spells and droughts are part of life for many farmers across New Zealand. Farmers monitor their local conditions, plan for dry weather, and make tough decisions early. MPI doesn’t declare droughts, but help to identify if the impacts...
Comments (0)
Number of views (4691)

Dry summer support

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Author: Marcia
The NIWA drought index measures dry conditions across the country. Their hotspot watch helps identify areas that are getting dry each week. Like all adverse events, a drought is classified as either localised, medium-scale or large-scale. What farmers need to do now Don’t hold out for rain as a reason to delay any decisions you need to make. Make plans and decisions in light of...
Comments (0)
Number of views (6184)
RSS